It’s A Small World, Food and Drugs From Around The World

July 3, 2012 | By
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It’s a small world, after all.  A trip to the supermarket or drugstore is food and drugs from around the world.

Many of the products you and your family buy, the medicines you use, and the foods you eat are from other countries. Did you know, for example, that 80 percent of our seafood and 80 percent of the active ingredients in medications consumed in the United States comes from abroad?

“Global Engagement”, a new, in-depth report from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), tells how the agency works to ensure that the imported foods, medical products, and other goods it regulates meet the same high standards for safety and quality set for products manufactured domestically.

The report was compiled to provide a face and voice to FDA’s global work, which includes overseas inspections and collaborations with governments in other countries, says FDA’s Mary Lou Valdez, associate commissioner for international programs.

Rather than focusing on the efforts of one FDA office or center, the report describes for the first time—through data, charts, vignettes, quotes, and narratives—the global engagement efforts taking place across the agency. The report also explains some of the challenges that FDA faces in fulfilling its mission.

“It truly is a different world for all of us working to ensure product safety,” says Valdez. “We had to recognize the complexity of the world in which we’re regulating.”

From Farm to Fork

Take food. FDA regulates most food products in the United States, from the lettuce you put in your family’s dinner salad, to the eggs and juice you serve for breakfast. As of 2011, roughly one in six FDA-regulated food products consumed in the United States comes from abroad. And the percentage is much higher in foods like fruits (about 50 percent) and vegetables (about 20 percent).

So the agency—empowered by the Food Safety Modernization Act signed into law in 2011—is focusing its efforts on making sure that foods from other countries meet U.S. safety standards before they reach the United States, and your family’s dinner plates. Investigators with FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs travel the globe to inspect facilities that produce food bound for the United States. Additionally, FDA’s Office of International Programs has stationed investigators in multiple overseas posts to complement these inspection efforts.

“Consumers around the world, not just in the United States, expect and demand safe food, no matter its source,” says Michael Taylor, FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods.

Read the whole story: FDA

 

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Category: COMMERCE, WELL-BEING

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